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Keynote Address Keynote Address
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Keynote Address

Led by Corey Seemiller, Ph.D.  Assistant Professor, Author, and Leadership Educator, Wright State University

Daring to Do What We Dream: Reinventing Our Classrooms for Tomorrow's Students

Teaching for Student Empowerment Teaching for Student Empowerment
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Teaching for Student Empowerment

Led by Sarah Augusto,  Jen Balboni, Amanda Kennedy, Mia Khera, Anjana Mudambi, Silas Pearman, and Stephanie Walker

Teaching is often content driven. We focus on how well students recall important concepts, their ability to digest complex readings, their success on written work. But what if, alongside learning course content, students became more empowered, socially conscious individuals? In considering questions of diversity and inclusion, this panel will suggest ways of empowering students—especially those who are traditionally marginalized in academia—in the classroom. Simple changes to a syllabus, new classroom activities, and finding ways to connect course content to the lived realities of marginalized people in our society can not only retain the attention of students sometimes left behind, but also empower them in ways that will reach beyond the classroom walls. We maintain that many of these strategies can be incorporated in any discipline with relative ease. The only requirement is a commitment to a more just classroom. 

What do I do when...? What do I do when...?
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What do I do when…?

Led by Provost Sczcerbacki

Several informal small group sessions with Faculty were held in January-February 2017 to share classroom management issues. The theme of these sessions was "What do I do when..." - a way of capturing challenges faculty are facing in their classes. This session will share the results of these sessions to inform further input and discussion. Results include classroom management concerns; expectations of students versus student performance; and the challenges of addressing unpredictable controversies and events. In addition, small "break-out" groups will generate ideas for responses and action, as appropriate, going forward.

 
Ideas to Action: Committing to Classroom Improvements in a Community of Practice Ideas to Action: Committing to Classroom Improvements in a Community of Practice
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Ideas to Action: Committing to Classroom Improvements in a Community of Practice

Led by Jen McNally and Maureen Murphy

In this session, participants will brainstorm an action plan for implementing student-centered instruction in their Fall 2017 class(es).  Throughout the Fall semester, participants will engage in regular asynchronous discussion with their colleagues as they implement the plan.  Together, participants can engage in scholarship of their own teaching and learning while the facilitators carry out a SoTL project in which they report on the peer-collaboration model for sustaining classroom innovations.

Got Interns? The Curry Internship Program Got Interns? The Curry Internship Program
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Got Interns? The Curry Internship Program

Led by Liz Carey, and Kerrie Aborn

When a student makes connections between the campus and the community, it benefits all of us. Field experiences for students can enhance classroom learning and motivation. The quality and quantity of internships a student undertakes during their college career can have a strong impact on their success after graduation. Learn about the College's internship program and how you can get connected and assist students through the process. This session will be especially helpful for faculty who teach in the following areas: Applied Technology, Fine and Applied Arts, Humanities, Politics and History, Science and Math. 

The Hijacked Brain: Understanding College-Age Addiction The Hijacked Brain: Understanding College-Age Addiction
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The Hijacked Brain: Understanding College-Age Addiction

Led by Ann Marie Leonard-Zabel

Substance Abuse is a very complex, multifaceted, dynamic problem facing college students that cannot be explained by a single neuro-educational factor. This presentation will explore the broad range of neuropsychological issues involving use and abuse of substances among college students, and how faculty can best address them. Focus will be on various neurocognitive profiling approaches including, but not limited to, attention, executive functioning, and memory impacting the ability to thrive within a college environment. Several evidence-based practices will be examined with regard to on-going interventions to promote school/work/life adjustment and achievement. A case study will be examined within an inter-active presentation and brainstorming style. 

Learning Outcomes, Faculty Autonomy, and My Course: Finding Balance Learning Outcomes, Faculty Autonomy, and My Course: Finding Balance
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Learning Outcomes, Faculty Autonomy, and My Course: Finding Balance

Led by Jessica Fry and Stephanie Walker

Faculty are charged with ensuring that courses and academic programs and rigorous and relevant for our students.  What roles do learning outcomes, program curricula, and vertical alignment and sequencing of courses play in the design and ongoing assessment of a course?  In the midst of these structures, in what ways can faculty autonomy be employed?  Join us as we explore the cycle of program evaluation and improvement through our case studies and apply new ways of thinking about learning outcomes assessment to your courses and programs.  Leave this session with a plan for structuring 2017-2018 to make the most of the LOAC cycle and ensure the rigor and relevance of your courses and programs for our students.

The Study Away Experience The Study Away Experience
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The Study Away Experience

Led by Grant Burrier, Pebble Brooks, Maryann Gallant, and Deanna Gordon

Study away experiences provide students an opportunity to study while immersed in an exciting location. Study away programs encourage students to expand their self-awareness and appreciate cultural diversity while engaging in relevant substantive topics, unique to the destination.  In this session, we will discuss designing, completing, and assessing trips and include suggestions on how to build coherent, content-targeted programs with meaningful learning outcomes.

Viewpoint Diversity Viewpoint Diversity
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Viewpoint Diversity

Led by Michael Bennett

Problems can arise in higher education that result from a lack of viewpoint diversity. To help address this problem in the classroom, there is a Viewpoint Diversity Experience (developed by Heterodox Academy).  In this session, we will work on an exercise that is designed "to foster mutual understanding within educational settings in order to prepare students for democratic citizenship and success in the politically diverse workplaces they will soon inhabit."

A Self-Study of Faculty Governance in Support of Student Learning A Self-Study of Faculty Governance in Support of Student Learning
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A Self-Study of Faculty Governance in Support of Student Learning

Led by Julian Bryson

Matters of faculty governance have great significance for the faculty's voice throughout the College. A faculty that wields influence in campus-wide decision-making leads to stronger faculty investment in student learning outcomes. Additionally, when the faculty has established efficient and effective structures for governance, they have more time and energy to devote to student instruction.  The newly formed ad hoc Faculty Governance Committee will be considering options to improve faculty governance. Participants in this session will brainstorm goals, processes and outcomes for that committee, producing guidance and ideas for the committee's consideration.

Responding to Student Disclosures: A Look at Faculty Rights and Obligations on Matters of Harassment and Discrimination Responding to Student Disclosures: A Look at Faculty Rights and Obligations on Matters of Harassment and Discrimination
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Responding to Student Disclosures: A Look at Faculty Rights and Obligations on Matters of Harassment and Discrimination

Led by Rachel King and Sandra O'Neil

Students may disclose very sensitive information to faculty.  Whether related to course content or not, responding appropriately to information about sexual harassment, violence or other forms of gender-based discrimination is a critical responsibility of all College employees.  This session takes a series of scenarios and offers the opportunity for participants to discuss how they might respond.  Attendees will also walk away with a clearer sense of College policies and resources, including the role of Liaisons, a group of trained faculty and staff available for consultation.

 

Tolerance and Inclusivity in the Classroom Tolerance and Inclusivity in the Classroom
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Tolerance and Inclusivity in the Classroom

Led by Monique Austin and Stephanie Cappadona

The purpose of this session is to discuss ways to foster a culture of inclusivity and civility in the classroom. We will focus on how to foster open discussion and debate while creating an environment where diversity is respected and where all students feel comfortable and supported. Participants will learn about the difference between free speech, biased speech, and hate speech and best practices to implement in the classroom. Participants will also learn how to handle a biased incident in the classroom and campus resources for addressing this issue.

With Honors: Rigor and Relevance for Curry College's Highly Motivated Students With Honors: Rigor and Relevance for Curry College's Highly Motivated Students
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With Honors: Rigor and Relevance for Curry College's Highly Motivated Students

Led by Jayson Baker, Christine Bennett, and Sarah Augusto

Have you ever wanted to teach in Curry's Honors program or wondered what the program is about? If so, this session is for you.In the fall 2017 semester, Curry College will add nearly 70 first-year students to the Honors program. The purpose of the session is twofold - to inform participants about the structure and direction of the Honors program, and to solicit ideas and feedback about how the program fits into the General Education curriculum. The facilitators will share their experiences within the Honors program and  provide updates about how the program is being revised. We will discuss how to "upgrade" existing courses as Honors and the challenges of standardizing learning outcomes for Honors level courses across the humanities and performing arts, social sciences and sciences. 

Joint Committee on Classroom Visits for Peer Evaluation Open Session Joint Committee on Classroom Visits for Peer Evaluation Open Session
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Joint Committee on Classroom Visits for Peer Evaluation Open Session

Led by the Task Force: Dotty Alexander, Jen Balboni, Mike Bosco, Tawanya Garrett, Maureen O'Shea, Kara Provost, Tricia McConville, and Ed Tallent

Join the Joint Committee for a final opportunity to provide your perspective on this engaging issue. The group will report briefly on feedback and ideas received to date,  solicit opinions on a few specific and potentially challenging issues, and review what the relevant literature and other institutions can teach us about these programs Primarily, however, the session will be structured for the Joint Committee to hear from you and for you to hear from your colleagues.